Tag Archive: SEO


How to import?
1. Go to your Facebook page (or create a new one here)
2. Click on the Notes tab in the top left hand corner (you may have to click on the plus sign to display it)
3. Select ‘Write a new note’
4. Once you’re in this window, you can access the Notes settings.
5. On the right-hand side of the Notes area, you can choose to import a blog.
6. Copy and paste the location of your blog’s RSS feed.
7. The page will then import your blog. After you have posted to your blog, the post will show up a little later in your Facebook page.
Why import a feed in to Facebook fan page?
If you are creating a Facebook page to promote your blog, importing the blog to the page means that all your blog posts will automatically appear on your Facebook page.
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Creators Larry Page and Sergey Brin met while at Stanford University and collaborated on a web search engine called “BackRub.” Over time, the engine became too large for the university’s servers and the pair decided it was time for a name change. They eventually came up with the name “Google,” which was based on the word “googol” – a mathematical term for the number 1 followed by 100 zeros! They believed this word encapsulated their goal of organizing the limitless amounts of information stored across the World Wide Web.

Here’s a timeline detailing the history of Google.
by OMG-facts.com

 

Twitter is a game changer for new blogs.  By far, it is the easiest and cheapest way to get readers to your blog.Today, Twitter is my #1 source of traffic.  It’s targeted and my readers are engaged, sassy, and extremely responsive.

Here’s a peek at some lesson’s I learned the hard way:
  • Don’t just RT: Tell your followers why you found a link useful.  Add a little commentary to help your followers decide if they want to click through. You’ll find that more of your followers will follow your links and spread them if they find value.
  • Give (much) More than you Receive: Frankly, I try to make tweeting my own links a rare occasion.  It’s difficult but the more I help and promote others the better I do.  Chris Brogan’s 12:1 equation – tweet 12 others for every one your tweets works for me.  Experiment with the ratio to find the right balance for yourself.  By the way, this forces you to look at other people’s work and not just your own – that’s a very good thing.
  • Keep it Short: I try to keep my tweets below 100 characters to leave ample room for retweets.  It’s a simple change that has drastically increased sharing of my tweets.
  • Respond to Mentions: Mentions are Twitter’s equivalent of comments.  Taking the time to answer and reply to mentions are a great way to get your followers engaged and retweeting.
  • Personally Welcome New Followers: Twitter users are bombarded by spam bots.  These bots auto-follow anyone that use certain keywords in their tweets or profiles.  This means that most people are wary of mentioning or retweeting another person until they confirm they are real.  Help them out by sending them a personal follow-up using info that shows you actually read their profile. Here’s mine. This is nice touch and very effective.
Feel free to modify and tweak these techniques to suit your personality, schedule and goals.  Give me a shout in the comments below to let me know how you plan to use these to get your tweets noticed.
 

Twitter Co-founders Biz Stone and Evan Williams shared the stage today in a rare joint appearance where they addressed criticism about Twitter’s usefulness in activism, its impact on news and its overarching vision for the future.
The co-founders participated in a lively fireside chat moderated by Businessweek’s Brad Stone at a sold-out event for the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco. The conversation started with a discussion about whether Twitter has become mainstream. Evan started by asking what “going mainstream” exactly meant, but he did say that Twitter gains more new user signups every week than the entire population of his home state of Nebraska. That’s 1.8 million users per week.
The conversation quickly moved into the rollout of the New Twitter. Both founders said that the reaction has been very positive. VP of Product Jason Goldman had been preparing the team for a backlash, but it simply never occurred. The goal of the new design, Biz Stone said, was to keep Twitter’s inherent simplicity intact while adding the richness and content people are linking to. Williams was the primary driver behind the new design.
The meat of the conversation really began when Brad Stone brought up a recent opinion piece in The New Yorker by best-selling author Malcolm Gladwell. In it, Gladwell downplayed the power of social media in social activism, critiquing the notion that social networks can spur social movements. Supporting a cause on Facebook

or Twitter involves neither a financial or personal risk, Gladwell wrote. Biz Stone responded to the criticism, stating that “some of it is right and some of it is wrong.” He agreed that tweeting doesn’t have the same impact as joining a physical protest where your life is at risk. However, he said it was “absurd” not to understand that Twitter and social media are complementary to that type of activism because of the ability to facilitate the fast exchange of information.

Williams followed up by saying that Twitter’s use in Iran was likely overstated, but it was an early sign of “what is possible and what we’re trying to enable.” The web and electronic networks are now a central point for organization of this type of activism, now that communities don’t all congregate in one place, such as the church, anymore, Williams said.

 


 

Twitter, Advertising and New CEOs

 


 

Brad Stone asked the Twitter co-founders how they felt about the separation of advertising and editorial content. Evan Williams responded that Twitter clearly labels any tweets or trends that are advertisements. More importantly, he made clear that Twitter is a mix of advertising and non-advertising content. He cited brands such as Starbucks as examples of users voluntarily opting in for promotional tweets about a product. After all, Starbucks didn’t get more than 1 million followers without a lot of people expressing interest in its products.
At one point, the Twitter founders were asked whether they thought the commercialization of the site was “bittersweet.” Biz Stone said he believed the company was succeeding in balancing advertising and commercial content with Twitter’s content quite well. “I want to ask you to name another platform where you can send a message to 5 million people for free,” he said. Yet if a company wanted to reach more people than their own followers, they had the opportunity to do so through Promoted Trends, Tweets or Accounts.
Of course, no Twitter interview this quarter would be complete without a discussion about Evan Williams stepping down as CEO of Twitter. There are plenty of product-oriented CEOs, and Brad Stone asked the Twitter co-founders why Williams didn’t choose to go that route instead. Williams responded that he chose roles at Twitter based on where he would be the most useful, and in fact, he was in his fourth role at Twitter.
Williams said he loved focusing on product the most, and he believed that the position of CEO of Twitter, due to its phenomenal growth, would require more attention on operational efficiency and personnel management than product strategy and direction, which excited Williams more than other factors.

 


 

Twitter and a Billion Users

 


 

Williams said the co-founders thought about Twitter in “broad strokes;” they were focused on helping people find out what’s happening in the world and becoming an indispensable service for spreading and consuming information woldwide.
This led to another question: Do Twitter’s execs think the service could reach a billion users, something Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg famously claimed his company would reach after it surpassed the 500 million user mark. Williams affirmed his belief, saying, “Twitter will get to a billion members.” He quickly added it wouldn’t be the same billion individuals as Facebook, and he wouldn’t specify just how long it would take to reach that goal.
His comments likely refer to his team’s belief that Facebook and Twitter are fundamentally different services with fundamentally different goals. Tonight’s conversation was entirely about Twitter as an information network, something that Twitter likes to emphasize anytime it’s compared to Facebook. In the eyes of Twitter’s cofounders, they’ve built a tool that has changed how we consume news and information for the better.

 

While Search Engine Optimization is about making your site visible to search engines, SMO’s concept is to optimize your site in order to make it visible on social media searches, easy to be linked to, visible on internet search engines for blogs.


Here Are The 5 Rules Of SMO…


Increase your linkability: Search engine optimization talks about getting relevant back links. Social media optimization however emphasizes on the need of making your website linkable. In most cases websites are hardly updated and display limited content. To enhance the linkable feature on such websites, adding a blog could be a better idea.

Make tagging and bookmarking easy: You need to add quick buttons to make bookmarking and tagging easier. You can also include list of relevant tags and suggested notes for a link. You need to tag your pages on popular social bookmarking sites as well.

Reward inbound links: The importance of inbound links could not be denied. A better way of increasing links is by encouraging the sites that link to you. You can do this by listing recent linking blogs on your site. You’ll be rewarding them and encourage others to do the same.

Help your content travel: When you have portable content like video files, audio files, PDFs, you need to let them travel. You can do this by submitting them to relevant sites. YouTube is one of the best ways to promote your videos online. When you submit your content on other sites you’ll be promoting your site and get links back to your site.

Encourage the mashup: In the process of establishing and maintaining relationships on web, you need to be more open and let others use your content. RSS feed is the best example for this, by syndicating your content others will be able to create mashups and promote your content.


Social media optimization is all about building relationships. You need to build trust, make the readers feel at ease and provide interesting content to make them return over and over again. You need to be creative and enjoy your social life on the World Wide Web.